Categories
Business

Suspects in Ghosn's Japanese escape stand trial in Turkey

ISTANBUL (Reuters) – Seven suspects went on trial in Turkey on Friday over their alleged involvement in former Nissan (7201.T) boss Carlos Ghosn’s dramatic escape from Japan to Lebanon via Istanbul at the end of last year.

Ghosn, once a titan of the global auto industry, had been arrested in Japan in late 2018 and charged with underreporting his salary and using company funds for personal purposes, charges he denies.

The ousted chairman of the alliance of Renault (RENA.PA), Nissan Motor Co and Mitsubishi Motors Corp (7211.T) had been awaiting his trial under house arrest in Japan when he made a dramatic escape in December to Beirut, his childhood home.

An executive from Turkish private jet operator MNG Jet and four pilots were detained in early January soon after Ghosn’s escape and charged with migrant smuggling, a sentence carrying a maximum sentence of eight years in jail.

They appeared in white protective overalls, masks and gloves as a measure against the coronavirus, as the court in Istanbul began hearing their defence. Two flight attendants, charged with failing to report a crime – a charge carrying a sentence of up to one year – were also there.

The first defendant to speak was a pilot on the Osaka-Istanbul flight, Noyan Pasin, who denied the charge.

Prosecutors, in their indictment, had said MNG Jet operations manager Okan Kosemen – who is one of the seven on trial – knew before the Osaka flight that Ghosn would be on board and would transfer to Beirut.

Kosemen, who also pleaded not guilty, said in court on Friday he was only told via phone about Ghosn’s presence mid-flight from Osaka and cooperated under duress.

The prosecution said Kosemen used WhatsApp to communicate with pilots before, during and after the Osaka-Istanbul flight, using terms like “luggage” and “consignment” to refer to Ghosn.

The five other suspects also deny the charges, according to the indictment.

SAGA SHAKES AUTO WORLD

According to the indictment, Kosemen told prosecutors a price of $175,000 was agreed for the flight with a Lebanese broker and paid into MNG Jet’s bank account.

At the time of the incident, MNG Jet said Kosemen acted without the knowledge of the company and it had filed a criminal complaint for the illegal use of its aircraft.

Japan has formally asked the United States to extradite two Americans – a former Green Beret and his son – who also stand accused of helping Ghosn flee Japan. They were arrested in Massachusetts in May.

The Ghosn saga has shaken the global auto industry, at one point jeopardising the Renault-Nissan alliance which he masterminded, and increased scrutiny of Japan’s judicial system.

Renault and Nissan have struggled to recover profitability following his tenure, during which both automakers say Ghosn focused too much on expanding sales and market share, leading to falling margins.

Turkish police detained the suspects on Jan. 2 and an interior ministry official was cited at the time as saying Turkish border police were not notified about Ghosn’s arrival, and neither his entry nor his exit were registered.

Source: Read Full Article

Categories
World News

Jeffrey Epstein’s friend Ghislaine Maxwell arrested by FBI

NEW YORK (BLOOMBERG) – Ghislaine Maxwell, a longtime associate of disgraced money manager Jeffrey Epstein, was arrested and charged with conspiracy and enticing minors to engage in sex. 

Maxwell was arrested on Thursday (Jul 2) in New Hampshire, FBI spokeswoman Adrienne Senatore said.

Prosecutors have scheduled a mid-day press conference in New York. 

The charges against Maxwell, in a six-count indictment, come almost a year after Epstein was arrested by FBI agents on July 6, 2019 after his private plane landed at a New Jersey airport.

Epstein killed himself in a federal jail in August. 

The new case signals that prosecutors are aggressively pushing ahead with the investigation into allegations that others helped Epstein abuse underage girls.

Maxwell, the daughter of the late British publisher Robert Maxwell, was close to Epstein for years. She has long denied that she was involved in Epstein’s actions. 

Maxwell is accused of scheming with Epstein from 1994 to at least 1997 to entice minor girls to be sexually abused by him, according to the indictment.

The victims, described by the US as “multiple minor girls,” were as young as 14 years old when Maxwell allegedly selected and “groomed” them to be abused by Epstein by luring them to Epstein’s various homes, including in Manhattan and Palm Beach, the US says. 

Maxwell was not only paid by Epstein to manage his properties but was also involved in an intimate sexual relationship with him, the US said. 

Maxwell is charged with two counts of conspiracy, perjury, enticing minors to engage in sex, and transporting a minor to engage in criminal activity. 

One of Epstein’s accusers, Virginia Giuffre, has claimed Epstein sexually abused her for two years starting in 2000, when she was 16, and that Maxwell recruited her while she was working at Donald Trump’s Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida. 

A federal appeals court in August unsealed hundreds of pages of long-awaited documents from Giuffre’s defamation lawsuit against Maxwell, revealing details about the alleged abuse. 

Source: Read Full Article

Categories
World News

Hong Kong police stabbing suspect arrested at airport after security law protests

HONG KONG (Reuters) – Hong Kong police arrested a 24-year-old man at the city’s airport in the early hours of Thursday on suspicion of attacking and wounding an officer during protests against a new national security law Beijing imposed on the financial hub.

Hong Kong police fired water cannon and tear gas and arrested more than 300 people on Wednesday as protesters took to the streets in defiance of the sweeping security legislation introduced by China to snuff out dissent.

On Wednesday, police posted pictures on Twitter of an officer with a bleeding arm saying he was stabbed by “rioters holding sharp objects”. The suspects fled while bystanders offered no help, police said.

A police spokesman told Reuters the arrested man was surnamed Wong but could not confirm if he was leaving Hong Kong or working at the airport.

Local newspaper Apple Daily, citing unnamed sources, said the suspect was onboard a Cathay Pacific flight to London due to depart just before midnight.

A witness said “around 10 minutes before take-off, three police vehicles drove towards No. 64 gate, outside the Cathay Pacific plane” and around 10 riot police ran up the bridge to the aircraft.

Local television Cable TV, citing a police source, said police received an anonymous call at 11.43 pm, 12 minutes before the flight was scheduled to depart, that the suspect was on his way to London. He bought a one-way ticket about two hours after the stabbing, the only purchase for that flight made on Wednesday, and arrived at the airport without luggage.

Related Coverage

  • Japan watching Hong Kong situation with 'great interest', government spokesman says
  • Australia weighs 'opportunities' for Hong Kong people after security law

He held an expired British National Overseas passport, a special status created under British law in 1987 that specifically relates to Hong Kong and provides a route to citizenship, the source told Cable TV.

Cathay Pacific did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Former Hong Kong leader Leung Chun-ying posted on Facebook on Wednesday that a bounty of HK$500,000 ($64,513) would be offered to anyone helping catch the fugitive and that confidentiality would be ensured.

The money would come via 803.hk, a website linked to Leung, which offers “crowdfunded” rewards for information leading to the prosecution of some anti-government protesters. The name of the site refers to an incident on Aug. 3, 2019, when a Chinese national flag was thrown into the sea during a protest.

Police said on Wednesday they had made around 370 arrests for illegal assembly and other offences, with 10 involving violations of the new security law.

The law punishes crimes of secession, subversion, terrorism and collusion with foreign forces with up to life in prison. It will also see mainland security agencies in Hong Kong for the first time and allows extradition to the mainland for trial in courts controlled by the Communist Party.

China’s parliament adopted the law in response to protests last year triggered by fears that Beijing was stifling the city’s freedoms, guaranteed by a “one country, two systems” formula agreed when it returned to Chinese rule in 1997. Beijing denies the accusation.

Chinese state media on Thursday praised the passage of the law, saying it would bring “prosperity and stability.”

“We must face up to the fact that the existence of legal loopholes in safeguarding national security has already made Hong Kong society pay a heavy price,” a commentary in People’s Daily, the official newspaper of the Communist Party, read.

($1 = 7.7504 Hong Kong dollars)

Source: Read Full Article

Categories
World News

Gunmen attack Mexican drug rehab center killing 24

MEXICO CITY (Reuters) – Gunmen killed 24 people at a drug rehabilitation facility in the central Mexican city of Irapuato, police said on Wednesday, underlining the government’s challenge in fulfilling its pledge to stop gang violence.

Police in the city in Guanajuato state said the unidentified attackers also shot and wounded seven people in what was the second attack at an Irapuato rehab center in the past month.

Photos from the scene shared by police with reporters showed at least 11 prone and bloodied bodies in a room.

Police said in a statement that three of the wounded were in grave condition, and that the facility was not formally registered.

Social media videos following the incident showed ambulances on site and several dozen people described as relatives of the victims clustered on the street.

Guanajuato’s Attorney General Carlos Zamarripa said he had designated a specialized team to investigate the killing, which he called a “cowardly criminal act,” while Governor Diego Sinhue called for a joint effort from federal and state authorities to tackle violence.

The attack was one of the worst mass slayings since President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador took office 19 months ago pledging to reduce record levels of violence. But homicides hit a new record last year and are trending higher still in 2020.

Guanajuato, a major carmaking hub, has become one of the principal flashpoints of criminal violence in Mexico, ravaged by a turf war between the local Santa Rosa de Lima gang and the powerful Jalisco New Generation Cartel.

According to federal data, Guanajuato registered 1,405 homicides this year through May, more than any other state.

On June 6, gunmen opened fire at a different addiction rehab center in Irapuato, killing 10 men. Rehab centers are known to have been targeted by criminal gangs waging battles for control of the drug business.

At least 26 people were killed in an arson attack by suspected gang members on a bar in the southern port of Coatzacoalcos last August.

Source: Read Full Article

Categories
World News

Hong Kong police arrest suspect at airport after officer assaulted in security law protests

HONG KONG (Reuters) – Hong Kong police arrested a 24-year-old man at the city’s airport in the early hours of Thursday on suspicion of attacking and wounding an officer during protests against a new national security law Beijing imposed on the financial hub.

Hong Kong police fired water cannon and tear gas and arrested more than 300 people on Wednesday as protesters took to the streets in defiance of the sweeping security legislation introduced by China to snuff out dissent.

On Wednesday, police posted pictures on Twitter of an officer with a bleeding arm saying he was stabbed by “rioters holding sharp objects”. The suspects fled while bystanders offered no help, police said.

A police spokesman told Reuters the arrested man was surnamed Wong but could not confirm if he was leaving Hong Kong or working at the airport.

Local newspaper Apple Daily, citing unnamed sources, said the suspect was onboard a Cathay Pacific flight to London due to depart just before midnight.

A witness said “around 10 minutes before take-off, three police vehicles drove towards No. 64 gate, outside the Cathay Pacific plane” and around 10 riot police ran up the bridge to the aircraft.

Cathay Pacific did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Police said on Wednesday they had made around 370 arrests for illegal assembly and other offences, with 10 involving violations of the new law.

The legislation punishes crimes of secession, subversion, terrorism and collusion with foreign forces with up to life in prison. It will also see mainland security agencies in Hong Kong for the first time and allows extradition to the mainland for trial in courts controlled by the Communist Party.

China’s parliament adopted the law in response to protests last year triggered by fears that Beijing was stifling the city’s freedoms, guaranteed by a “one country, two systems” formula agreed when it returned to Chinese rule in 1997. Beijing denies the accusation.

Source: Read Full Article

Categories
World News

Military deployed in Ethiopian capital after more than 80 killed in protests

ADDIS ABABA (Reuters) – The military was deployed in the Ethiopian capital on Wednesday, as armed gangs roamed neighbourhoods in a second day of unrest that has claimed more than 80 lives and deepened political divisions in Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed’s political heartland.

The protests were sparked by the assassination of popular musician Haacaaluu Hundeessaa on Monday night and spread from Addis Ababa to the surrounding Oromiya region.

The killing tapped into grievances fuelled by decades of government repression and what the Oromo, Ethiopia’s biggest ethnic group, describe as their historic exclusion from political power.

“I am angry. It’s eating me inside,” protestor Ishetu Alemu told Reuters as tires smouldered in the street behind him.

Gunshots echoed through many neighbourhoods and gangs armed with machetes and sticks roamed the streets. Six witnesses described a situation pitting youths of Oromo origin against some of the city’s other ethnic groups, and where both sides skirmished with police.

“We had a meeting with the community, and we were told to arm ourselves with anything we have, including machetes and sticks. We no longer trust the police to protect us, so we have to prepare ourselves,” said one Addis Ababa resident, who like others interviewed asked not to be named for fear of reprisal.

An Oromo family said an armed gang had tried to break into their compound. Police had responded, but said they couldn’t stay – they were getting too many other calls.

Related Coverage

  • Protests in Ethiopian town of Adama kill eight, injure 80, doctor says

The military had been deployed in some areas, three witnesses said. One described a street littered with rocks that anti-Oromo protesters had thrown at police.

FUNERAL FLASHPOINT

Many residents feared Haacaaluu’s funeral – scheduled for Thursday in his home town of Ambo – could ignite more violence.

“Security forces have invaded our town, we can’t go out to mourn. No vehicles are moving around except security patrols with machine-guns,” 27-year-old student Chala Hunde told Reuters by phone from Ambo, about 100 km (60 miles) west of Addis. “The security forces are putting a finger in our wound.”

A tussle over whether to bury Haacaaluu in Ambo or Addis laid bare the political tensions fanning the protests, said Professor Awol Allo at Britain’s Keele University.

“It’s very contentious. Oromos claim the city (Addis) to be theirs, as it lies fully within the Oromo regional state,” he said. But the capital is under federal, not regional control.

The state broadcaster reported the arrest of prominent journalist and activist Eskinder Nega, a former political prisoner who runs a pressure group opposed to what it describes as Oromo attempts to dominate the capital.

The dispute over Addis triggered three years of bloody street demonstrations that led to the resignation of the previous prime minister and Abiy’s appointment in the post in 2018. Haacaaluu’s music was the soundtrack to a generation of young Oromos who spearheaded the protests.

CASUALTIES

More than 80 people were killed in the clashes in Oromiya on Tuesday, including protesters and members of the security forces, regional police commissioner Bedassa Merdassa told state-run Ethiopian Broadcasting Corporation on Wednesday.

The dead included 78 civilians and three members of the security forces, he said.

A policeman was also killed in Addis Ababa, and three explosions there caused an unspecified number of deaths.

Another potential flashpoint is the arrests of prominent Oromo opposition leader Bekele Gerba and media mogul Jawar Mohammed on Tuesday.

Abiy, Haacaaluu and Jawar are all Oromo. The singer and media owner have become more critical of the prime minister in recent months; some Oromo activists accuse him of repression.

In federal Ethiopia, power is traditionally derived through controlling large ethnic voting blocs. Under the previous administration, voting was rarely free or fair; opposition activists were jailed, tortured or driven into exile.

Abiy has allowed greater political freedoms and promised free and fair elections. But his new pan-Ethiopian party faces stiff competition from regional powerbrokers like Jawar, determined to stake claims for their people.

Jawar’s popular Oromo Media Network means he can mobilise supporters quickly in Oromiya even when the internet is down, as it has been since Tuesday morning. His power base could pose a significant challenge to Abiy’s party in next year’s elections.

Source: Read Full Article

Categories
World News

At least 52 killed in Ethiopia protests over singer's death

ADDIS ABABA (Reuters) – At least 50 people were killed in Ethiopia’s Oromiya region in protests following the fatal shooting of a popular singer, a regional spokesman said on Wednesday, laying bare splits in the prime minister’s political heartland ahead of next year’s polls.

Musician Haacaaluu Hundeessaa was shot dead on Monday night in what police said was a targeted killing.

Protests reflecting anger at the killing of a popular figure and a sense of political marginalisation broke out the next morning in the capital and other towns and cities in the surrounding Oromiya region.

The dead included protesters and members of the security forces, spokesman Getachew Balcha said. Some businesses had also been set on fire.

“We were not prepared for this,” he said.

Related Coverage

  • Protests in Ethiopian town of Adama kill eight, injure 80, doctor says

Police said late on Tuesday that a policeman was also killed in Addis Ababa, and three explosions there had killed and injured an unspecified number of people.

Prominent Oromo opposition leader Bekele Gerba and media mogul Jawar Mohammed were also arrested when Jawar’s bodyguards refused to disarm during a stand-off with police.

Haacaaluu, whose funeral will be held Thursday, provided a soundtrack to a generation of young protesters. Their three years of bloody street demonstrations forced the unprecedented resignation of the previous prime minister and the appointment of Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed in 2018.

Abiy, Haacaaluu and Jawar are all Oromo, Ethiopia’s largest ethnic group, which has long complained of being excluded from power.

Jawar was a prominent supporter of Abiy’s appointment, but became more openly critical last year. Jawar’s popular Oromo Media Network gives him the ability to mobilise support quickly across Oromiya and his power base could pose a significant challenge to Abiy’s party in next year’s elections.

Ethiopia’s federal structure means power was traditionally derived by claiming the support of large ethnic voting blocs. Under the previous administration, voting was rarely free or fair and opposition activists were often jailed, torture or driven into exile.

Abiy has allowed much greater political freedoms and promised the next polls will be free and fair. But his new ruling party, based on a pan-Ethiopian vision, faces stiff competition from newly emboldened regional powerbrokers like Jawar determined to stake claims for their people after decades of repression.

Source: Read Full Article

Categories
World News

Hong Kong police fire water cannon at crowds protesting new security law

BEIJING/HONG KONG (Reuters) – Hong Kong police fired water cannon on Wednesday to break up the first protest since China introduced sweeping security legislation and they made their first arrests under it, warning of punishment for advocating secession or subversion.

Beijing on Tuesday unveiled the details of the much-anticipated law after weeks of uncertainty, pushing China’s freest city and one of the world’s most glittering financial hubs onto a more authoritarian path.

As thousands of protesters gathered downtown for an annual rally marking the anniversary of the former British colony’s handover to China in 1997, riot police used pepper spray to make arrests, while shops and one metro station closed.

“I’m scared of going to jail but for justice I have to come out today, I have to stand up,” said one 35-yaer-old man who gave his name as Seth.

Crowds spilling out into the streets chanted “resist till the end” and “Hong Kong independence”.

Police fired water cannon to chase them away and later said they had made 30 arrests for illegal assembly, obstruction, possession of weapons and violating the new law.

Earlier, police cited the law for the first time in confronting protesters.

“You are displaying flags or banners/chanting slogans/or conducting yourselves with an intent such as secession or subversion, which may constitute offences under the … national security law,” police said in a message displayed on a purple banner.

Related Coverage

  • Hong Kong police fire water cannon to disperse national security law protesters
  • Highlights: China unveils details of national security law for Hong Kong

The law will punish crimes of secession, subversion, terrorism and collusion with foreign forces with up to life in prison and officially set up mainland security agencies in Hong Kong for the first time, with powers beyond city laws.

China’s parliament adopted it in response to months of pro-democracy protests last year triggered by fears that Beijing was stifling the city’s freedoms, guaranteed by a “one country, two systems” formula agreed when it returned to Chinese rule.

Authorities in Beijing and Hong Kong have repeatedly said the legislation is aimed at a few “troublemakers” and will not affect rights and freedoms, nor investor interests.

But critics fear it will crush the freedoms that are seen as key to Hong Kong’s success as a financial centre.

“With the release of the full detail of the law, it should be clear to those in any doubt that this is not the Hong Kong they grew up in,” said Hasnain Malik, head of equity research, Tellimer in Dubai.

“The difference is that U.S. and China relations are far worse and this could be used as a pretext to impede the role of Hong Kong as a finance hub.”

(For more analysts comments, click)

In Beijing, Zhang Xiaoming, executive deputy director of Beijing’s Hong Kong and Macau Affairs Office, told reporters suspects arrested by a new Beijing-run security office could be tried on the mainland.

He said the new office abided by Chinese law and that Hong Kong’s legal system could not be expected to implement the laws of the mainland. Article 55 of the law states that Beijing’s security office in Hong Kong could exercise jurisdiction over “complex” or “serious” cases.

“The law is a birthday gift to (Hong Kong) and will show its precious value in the future,” Zhang said, adding the law would not be applied retroactively.

(For highlights of the law, click)

On July 1 last year, hundreds of protesters stormed and vandalised the city’s legislature to protest against a now-scrapped bill that would have allowed extraditions to mainland China.

Those protests evolved into calls for greater democracy, paralysing parts of the city and paving the way for Beijing’s imposition of the law this week.

‘INEVITABLE’

Speaking at a flag-raising ceremony to mark the handover anniversary, the city’s Beijing-backed leader, Carrie Lam, said the law was the most important development since the city’s return to Chinese rule.

“It is also an inevitable and prompt decision to restore stability,” Lam said at the harbour-front venue where 23 years ago the last colonial governor, Chris Patten, a staunch critic of the security law, tearfully handed back Hong Kong to Chinese rule.

Some pro-Beijing officials and political commentators say the law is aimed at sealing Hong Kong’s “second return” to the motherland after the first failed to bring residents to heel.

Luo Huining, the head of Beijing’s top representative office in Hong Kong, said at the ceremony the law was a “common aspiration” of Hong Kong citizens.

Critics denounced the lack of transparency on details of the legislation until it was unveiled. It came into force at 11 p.m. (1500 GMT) on Tuesday.

Some pro-democracy activists gave up membership of their groups just before the law came into force, though calling for the campaign for democracy to go on offshore.

“I saw this morning there are celebrations for Hong Kong’s handover, but to me it is a funeral, a funeral for ‘one country two systems’,” said pro-democracy lawmaker Kwok Ka-ki.

Source: Read Full Article

Categories
World News

'Not a generic name': Booking.com wins trademark fight at U.S. Supreme Court

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The travel reservation company Booking.com, a unit of Booking Holdings Inc, deserves to be able to trademark its name, the U.S. Supreme Court decided on Tuesday, overruling a federal agency that found it too generic to merit protection. The court decided 8-1 that the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office was incorrect when it denied the company’s application to trademark the name Booking.com, with the justices finding it distinctive enough that the agency should have approved it.

The court said surveys made clear that consumers understand that Booking.com refers to a particular company, and not online hotel reservation services in general.

“Because ‘Booking.com’ is not a generic name to consumers, it is not generic,” liberal Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg wrote in the ruling.

In a dissent, liberal Justice Stephen Breyer said the court’s majority had put too much emphasis on consumer surveys, which he said were of limited value.

Booking.com, based in Amsterdam, welcomed the ruling, with spokeswoman Kimberly Soward saying in a statement that it “demonstrates that the U.S. legal system has the capacity to evolve in order to reflect the digital world we are all living in.”

David Bernstein, a lawyer for Booking.com, called the decision “a victory for countless brand owners that have invested significant resources in building their brands – such as Weather.com, Law.com, Wine.com and Hotels.com.”

U.S. Patent and Trademark Office spokesman Paul Fucito declined to comment.

U.S. law allows trademark registrations only on terms that are “descriptive,” or able to distinguish a particular product or service from others on the market. “Generic” words that refer to an entire category of goods or services, like “car” or “computer,” cannot be protected under the law because that would give an unfair competitive advantage to the trademark holder. Booking.com began using its name globally in 2006, and filed U.S. trademark applications in 2011 and 2012. A U.S. Patent and Trademark Office tribunal rejected those applications in 2016, saying “booking” is a generic term for a category of services and that the addition of “.com” did not transform it into a protected trademark. Lower courts sided with Booking.com, prompting the patent office’s Supreme Court appeal. Tuesday’s ruling may guide how some other companies, such as Salesforce.com Inc and Home Depot Inc, protect their brands from potential copycats.

The May 4 oral argument in the case was the first that the justices held by teleconference amid the coronavirus pandemic. In another first, the public was able to hear arguments through a live audio feed.

Source: Read Full Article

Categories
World News

U.S. FCC issues final orders declaring Huawei, ZTE national security threats

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The Federal Communications Commission on Tuesday formally designated Chinese’s Huawei Technologies Co and ZTE Corp (000063.SZ) as posing threats to U.S. national security, a declaration that bars U.S. firms from tapping an $8.3 billion government fund to purchase equipment from the companies.

The U.S. telecommunications regulator voted in November 5-0 to issue the declaration and proposed requiring rural carriers to remove and replace equipment from the two Chinese companies from existing U.S. networks. “We cannot and will not allow the Chinese Communist Party to exploit network vulnerabilities and compromise our critical communications infrastructure,” FCC Chairman Ajit Pai said in a statement Tuesday.

Huawei and ZTE did not immediately respond to requests for comment but have previously sharply criticized the FCC’s actions.

FCC Commissioner Geoffrey Starks said on Tuesday that “untrustworthy equipment” remains in place in U.S. networks and said the U.S. Congress must allocate funding for replacements.

In May 2019, Trump signed an executive order declaring a national emergency and barring U.S. companies from using telecommunications equipment made by companies posing a national security risk. The Trump administration also added Huawei to its trade blacklist last year.

The FCC has taken an increasingly hard line against Chinese firms.

In April, the FCC said it may shut down U.S. operations of three state-controlled Chinese telecommunications companies

The FCC required China Telecom Americas (0728.HK), China Unicom Americas (0762.HK), Pacific Networks Corp and its wholly owned subsidiary ComNet (USA) LLC to explain why it should not start the process of revoking authorizations enabling their U.S. operations.

The FCC granted its approvals to the firms more than a decade ago.

In May 2019, the FCC voted to deny another state-owned Chinese telecommunications company, China Mobile Ltd (0941.HK), the right to provide U.S. services, citing risks that the Chinese government could use the company to conduct espionage against the U.S. government.

Source: Read Full Article